Monday, December 9, 2013

Quilled Snowflake Pattern and Quilled Christmas Ornaments

It's becoming a tradition to feature Beth Reece's beautiful quilling each December. You'll find previous posts here and here, but before clicking over, enjoy the tree ornaments she's been making this holiday season.

quilled-wreath

Beth uses metallic-edged paper to great effect and often adds strips she runs through a crimper.

quilled-ornament

She likes to glue on Swarovski flat back crystals as they catch the light and sparkle.

quilled-mandala

 quilled-angel

Cute birds! She used a beehive technique to fill in the largest one's body.

quilled-birds

Beth even found time to make all of these little red poinsettias to hang individually.
 
quilled-red-poinsettias

She loves to make quilled snowflakes too, as this showstopper wreath proves.

quilled-snowflake-wreath

I asked Beth if she would share one of her patterns and lucky for us, she agreed - thank you, Beth! This snowflake measures about 2.5 inches across - beautiful, yet not too complicated for beginners.

quilled-snowflake-tutorial

If you're new to quilling, these tutorials - here or here - go over basic techniques and tools. There's no need to buy quilling paper if you would like to get started right away. 1/8 inch strips cut from copy paper will be fine for practice; use a paper trimmer or a cutting mat, craft knife, and metal ruler. True quilling paper is a little thicker and softer than copy paper, and strips measure 17-25 inches in length depending on the manufacturer. Beth likes to use Quilled Creations Bright White paper to make snowflakes as she finds the strips are thicker than her usual favorite brand, Paplin. The extra weight makes the snowflakes quite sturdy. You might want to print out a lined grid to use as a guide while assembling coils so your snowflake will be balanced.

This snowflake design includes eccentric teardrops - referring to photo, they are the coils with pointed tips, and V scrolls.

To make an eccentric teardrop:
Work on a corkboard or circle template. Pull the center of a loose (round) coil to one side with a straight pin. Push two pins into cork, one on each side of the coil, to secure the center. (Just one pin is needed for the circle template as it has a recessed lip to push against.) Apply a tiny amount of glue to this spot. When glue has dried, remove the pins. This new shape is called an eccentric loose coil. Pinch a sharp point opposite the glued area to create an eccentric teardrop.

To make a V scroll:
Fold strip in half and roll ends inward toward fold.

Ready, set, go!

Make the bottom layer:
1. Make a 10-inch (that's the strip length) eccentric teardrop. (make 12)
2. Make a 5-inch V scroll. (make 6)
3. Refer to photo:
a. Glue the base of a V scroll to the base of a 10-inch eccentric teardrop. Glue the V scroll ends to each side of the teardrop tip. (make 6) 
b. Glue these eccentric teardrop/V scroll combos in a circle with tips pointing outward.
c. Glue the base of a 10-inch eccentric teardrop between a V scroll's coiled ends. (repeat 6 times)

Make the top layer:
4. Crimp a ten-inch strip. Roll crimped strip on quilling tool and glue end.
5. Make a 5-inch eccentric teardrop. (make 6)
6. Refer to photo:
a. Glue the 5-inch eccentric teardrops around the crimped coil with points facing outward, spacing them evenly.
b. Glue this layer to the center of the bottom layer.

7. Glue a 5 mm crystal at the center of the crimped coil.
8. Glue a 3 mm crystal between each 5-inch eccentric teardrop. (6)

Here's a pretty variation... Beth sprinkled on clear micro-beads for a frosted look. She sometimes uses silver-edged or holofoil-edged strips to make snowflakes too.

quilled-snowflake-microbeads

To create a hanging loop for your ornament, fold a ten inch piece of fine metallic cord in half, insert the loop end through the tip of one outermost eccentric teardrop, catching a couple of the inner spirals for extra strength, bring the tails through the loop, and tie tails in a knot.

You might enjoy the series of five snowflakes that Cecelia Louie has been sharing on her blog Paper Zen recently She shows some fresh design ideas and offers a grid too.



14 comments:

  1. Your Quill work is stunning. This peacock colored wreath is beautiful. Thank you for sharing. December Delights...

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  2. Beautiful. I especially like the snowflakes and poinsettia.

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  3. thanks Beth for sharing your most beautiful quilled christmas pieces!!
    i adore them all!!!
    i love the angel's colours and design....the blue wreath is unusual and eyecatching.....the snowflake are just delightful and the birds are superb!!! thanks also for the tutorial. merry christmas.
    licia politis

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  4. just gorgeous!!! thanks for sharing

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  5. These are all stunning Ann. I would have never thought of microbeads. So lovely. You're making me want to try my hand at quilling!

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  6. Takes your breath away!!!! BEAUTIFUL!!!
    Jan

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  7. Your quilling work is absolutely stunning.

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  8. I love to decorate with paper snowflakes at Christmas. Perhaps I'll try my hand at a simple quilled one. Yours are so beautiful!!

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  9. Beautiful Beautiful quilling. The metal edge paper does add beauty to her elegant curls. The snowflakes are amazing. can't stop admiring Beth's gorgeous quilling.

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  10. This makes me want to quill again. Now to find the time!

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  11. Love all Beth's quilled ornaments. Simply gorgeous!!

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  12. Oh my - gorgeous ornaments! Thanks for sharing them!

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  13. Oh my, these are absolutely gorgeous! You are quite talented and very patient. I've tried quilling but have never had any teach me how to do it correctly. Thank you for sharing your beautiful creations, they are really quite stunning. Happy Holidays!

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